Threat Hunting with The Hive, Cortex and MISP

ByNiels Groenveld

March 30, 2023 , ,

As cyber threats continue to evolve, organizations must proactively identify and mitigate potential threats to their IT infrastructure. Threat hunting has become a critical component of modern cybersecurity operations as it allows organizations to detect and respond to advanced cyber threats before they cause any significant harm. To achieve this, many organizations use a combination of threat intelligence and incident response platforms such as TheHive, Cortex, and MISP.

In this guide, we’ll delve into the technical aspects of threat hunting with TheHive, Cortex, and MISP, providing expert insights and best practices from experienced security analysts and operations teams.

Defining Threat Hunting and Its Importance in Cybersecurity Operations

In the ever-changing landscape of cybersecurity, threats are becoming more sophisticated and challenging to detect. Organizations need to be proactive in identifying and mitigating potential threats before they cause any significant damage. Threat hunting is a proactive security measure that enables organizations to stay ahead of emerging threats by continuously searching for and detecting potential threats within their IT infrastructure.

Threat hunting involves actively searching for indicators of compromise (IOCs), anomalies, or other signs of suspicious activity that might indicate an ongoing or imminent attack. The goal is to detect and mitigate potential threats before they cause any damage. Threat hunting complements traditional security measures such as firewalls, antivirus software, and intrusion detection systems, which are reactive and may not be effective against advanced and persistent threats.

Threat hunting is an essential component of a comprehensive cybersecurity strategy. By proactively searching for and mitigating potential threats, organizations can reduce their attack surface and improve their overall security posture. Threat hunting can also help organizations comply with regulatory requirements by demonstrating that they have taken proactive measures to protect their assets.

TheHive: An Overview

TheHive is a powerful open-source platform that provides security teams with an integrated suite of tools for threat intelligence and incident response. It is designed to help security teams streamline their incident response processes and improve collaboration among team members.

The platform’s main features include:

  1. Case Management: TheHive provides a central location for security teams to manage their incident response workflows, including creating and assigning cases, tracking progress, and documenting actions taken.
  2. Collaboration: TheHive enables security analysts to collaborate and share information in real-time, improving communication and reducing response times.
  3. Integration: TheHive can be easily integrated with other tools and platforms, including Cortex and MISP, to provide a comprehensive threat intelligence and incident response platform.
  4. Customization: TheHive’s flexible and modular architecture allows organizations to customize the platform to meet their specific needs. Customizations can be made through the use of plugins and custom scripts.

Best Practices for Using TheHive

To effectively use TheHive, security teams should follow best practices that include the following:

  1. Develop and implement comprehensive incident response workflows that include TheHive.
  2. Ensure that all team members are trained and familiar with TheHive’s capabilities and workflows.
  3. Regularly review and update workflows to ensure that they remain effective.
  4. Continuously monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of TheHive and make necessary adjustments as needed.
  5. Leverage community contributions and customizations to enhance the capabilities of TheHive.

Cortex: Automating Threat Intelligence and Response

Cortex is an automated threat intelligence and response platform that enables organizations to automate the collection, analysis, and sharing of threat intelligence data. It is designed to streamline the threat intelligence process and automate repetitive tasks, freeing up security analysts’ time to focus on higher-level tasks.

Cortex’s flexible and modular architecture allows it to be easily integrated with other tools and platforms, such as TheHive and MISP, to provide a comprehensive threat intelligence and incident response platform. Cortex provides a broad range of built-in analyzers for common threats, and its open-source nature allows for community contributions and customizations.

Some of the key features of Cortex include:

  1. Automated Analysis: Cortex automates the analysis of threat intelligence data, allowing organizations to quickly and efficiently identify potential threats. Its built-in analyzers cover a wide range of common threats, and additional analyzers can be added as needed.
  2. Customizable Workflows: Cortex’s flexible workflow engine allows organizations to customize the threat intelligence process to meet their specific needs. Workflows can be easily configured to automate repetitive tasks, such as data collection and analysis.
  3. Integration with Other Tools: Cortex integrates with a wide range of other tools and platforms, including TheHive and MISP. This enables organizations to leverage the capabilities of these platforms to enhance their threat intelligence and incident response activities.
  4. Real-Time Collaboration: Cortex provides real-time collaboration capabilities, allowing security teams to share information and collaborate on threat intelligence data in real-time.
  5. Open-Source and Community-Driven: Cortex is open-source and community-driven, allowing for contributions and customizations from a wide range of organizations and individuals.

Best Practices for Using Cortex

To effectively use Cortex, security teams should follow best practices that include the following:

  1. Develop and implement comprehensive threat intelligence and incident response workflows that include Cortex.
  2. Ensure that all team members are trained and familiar with Cortex’s capabilities and workflows.
  3. Regularly review and update workflows to ensure that they remain effective.
  4. Continuously monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of Cortex and make necessary adjustments as needed.
  5. Leverage community contributions and customizations to enhance the capabilities of Cortex.

MISP: Sharing and Collaborating on Threat Intelligence Data

MISP is a powerful open-source threat intelligence platform that enables organizations to share and collaborate on threat intelligence data. It provides a range of features, including support for STIX and TAXII, customizable threat feeds, and the ability to import and export data from other platforms.

MISP’s key features include:

  1. Threat Intelligence Sharing: MISP enables organizations to share threat intelligence data with other organizations in real-time. This improves the overall security posture of the community by allowing organizations to quickly identify and respond to threats.
  2. STIX and TAXII Support: MISP supports the STIX and TAXII standards for threat intelligence data, making it compatible with a wide range of other threat intelligence platforms.
  3. Customizable Threat Feeds: MISP allows organizations to create custom threat feeds based on their specific needs, enabling them to focus on the threats that are most relevant to their organization.
  4. Automated Threat Feeds: MISP can be configured to automatically import and export threat feeds from other platforms, saving time and reducing the risk of errors.
  5. Open-Source and Community-Driven: MISP is open-source and community-driven, allowing for contributions and customizations from a wide range of organizations and individuals.

Best Practices for Using MISP

To effectively use MISP, security teams should follow best practices that include the following:

  1. Develop and implement comprehensive threat intelligence sharing workflows that include MISP.
  2. Ensure that all team members are trained and familiar with MISP’s capabilities and workflows.
  3. Regularly review and update workflows to ensure that they remain effective.
  4. Continuously monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of MISP and make necessary adjustments as needed.
  5. Leverage community contributions and customizations to enhance the capabilities of MISP.

Threat Hunting with All: A Comprehensive Approach

Threat hunting with TheHive, Cortex, and MISP is a critical practice for any organization looking to enhance its cybersecurity posture. This comprehensive approach requires a structured and systematic process that includes several key steps.

  1. The first step is to define the objectives and scope of the hunt. This involves identifying the specific areas of the network or infrastructure that will be targeted, the types of threats that are most likely to be present, and the goals of the hunt. By developing a comprehensive plan for the hunt, including the tools and techniques that will be used and the team members that will be involved, the security team can focus their efforts on the most critical areas.
  2. The second step is to gather threat intelligence data from various sources, including internal logs, external feeds, and other security tools. TheHive and MISP are particularly useful for this step, as they provide a comprehensive platform for collecting, analyzing, and sharing threat intelligence data. By aggregating and analyzing data from multiple sources, security teams can identify patterns and anomalies that may indicate potential threats.
  3. The third step is to analyze the threat intelligence data to identify potential threats. This involves using a combination of automated and manual analysis techniques to identify patterns, anomalies, and other indicators of potential threats. Cortex is particularly useful for this step, as it provides a wide range of built-in analyzers that can be used to automatically identify common threats. Manual analysis may also be necessary to identify more complex and sophisticated threats.
  4. The fourth step is to prioritize potential threats based on their severity and potential impact on the organization. This involves assigning a risk score to each threat, based on factors such as the likelihood of occurrence and the potential damage it could cause. TheHive and Cortex can both be used to prioritize threats based on their severity, allowing security teams to focus on the most critical threats first.
  5. The fifth step is to investigate and respond to potential threats that have been identified. This involves performing a more in-depth analysis of each potential threat and developing a response plan to address it. TheHive provides a centralized platform for investigating and responding to threats, allowing security teams to collaborate and coordinate their efforts effectively. Response plans should be developed to ensure that the threat is contained, and the damage is mitigated.
  6. The final step is to monitor the effectiveness of the threat hunting program and evaluate the results. This involves regularly reviewing and analyzing the threat hunting data to identify any areas for improvement and to ensure that the program is aligned with the organization’s security goals. The data collected should be used to identify gaps in the security posture and enhance the threat hunting program.

In addition to these key steps, there are several best practices that organizations can follow to improve their threat hunting capabilities. These include establishing clear objectives for the threat hunting program, collecting and analyzing comprehensive data from multiple sources, automating where possible, collaborating and communicating effectively among team members, and regularly reviewing and evaluating the program to ensure that it remains aligned with the organization’s security goals.

Best Practices for Threat Hunting with TheHive, Cortex, and MISP

Threat hunting with TheHive, Cortex, and MISP requires a structured and systematic approach to be effective. Here are some best practices that organizations can follow to improve their threat hunting capabilities:

Establish Clear Objectives

The objectives and scope of a threat hunting operation should be clearly defined and well-understood by all members of the security team. Without clear objectives, it can be difficult to identify and prioritize potential threats, resulting in wasted time and resources. It’s important to understand the types of threats that are most likely to be present in the network or infrastructure being targeted, and to set realistic goals for the hunt.

Collect and Analyze Comprehensive Data

Comprehensive and accurate data is essential for effective threat hunting. Teams should leverage a variety of sources, including internal logs, external feeds, and other security tools, to gather as much relevant data as possible. TheHive and MISP provide a powerful platform for collecting, analyzing, and sharing threat intelligence data from multiple sources. Teams should also consider using additional tools and techniques, such as network traffic analysis or endpoint detection and response (EDR) tools, to supplement the data gathered from TheHive and MISP.

Automate Where Possible

Automating threat hunting tasks can increase the efficiency and accuracy of the process. Cortex provides a range of built-in analyzers for common threats, and TheHive can be used to automate incident response workflows. By automating routine tasks, such as data collection and analysis, security teams can focus on more complex and critical tasks that require human intervention. Automation can also help reduce the risk of errors or oversights that can occur with manual processes.

Collaborate and Communicate

Effective collaboration and communication are essential for successful threat hunting. TheHive and MISP provide a centralized platform for security teams to collaborate and share information, enabling team members to work together efficiently and effectively. By sharing information and insights, teams can better identify potential threats and develop more effective response plans. It’s also important to communicate the results of threat hunting operations to other stakeholders within the organization, such as IT or executive teams, to ensure that everyone is aware of the security risks and the steps being taken to address them.

Regularly Review and Evaluate

Threat hunting programs should be regularly reviewed and evaluated to ensure that they remain aligned with the organization’s security goals. By reviewing and analyzing the data gathered during threat hunting operations, security teams can identify areas for improvement and adjust their processes accordingly. Regular evaluations can also help teams identify trends or patterns in the data that may indicate new or emerging threats that require further investigation.

Conclusion

Threat hunting with TheHive, Cortex, and MISP is a comprehensive and effective approach to cybersecurity. By leveraging these powerful platforms, security teams can automate threat intelligence and response processes, collaborate effectively, and stay ahead of emerging threats. To be successful, organizations must establish clear objectives, collect and analyze comprehensive data, automate where possible, collaborate and communicate effectively, and regularly review and evaluate their threat hunting programs. By following these best practices, organizations can enhance their threat hunting capabilities and keep their networks and infrastructure secure.

In summary, TheHive, Cortex, and MISP provide a powerful combination of tools that enable organizations to conduct comprehensive threat hunting operations. By following a structured and systematic approach, security teams can leverage these platforms to collect, analyze, and prioritize threat intelligence data, investigate and respond to potential threats, and continuously improve their threat hunting capabilities. With the increasing complexity and sophistication of cyber threats, it’s critical for organizations to adopt a proactive and comprehensive approach to cybersecurity, and threat hunting with TheHive, Cortex, and MISP is an essential component of this strategy.

Original Source: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/threat-hunting-thehive-cortex-misp-comprehensive-guide-groeneveld/?trackingId=UtUa0o4AQKeV22RzBgNb1Q%3D%3D

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Niels Groenveld
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